Asian Pear Trees

Asian Pear Trees

Asian Pear TreesPyrus pyrifolia, or Asian pears, are a large group of pears that have a crisp texture when fully ripened, unlike European pears that must be softened prior to eating.  The Asian pear trees include the Chojuro , Hosui, Olympic Giant, Shinko,  Large Korean, and several others and they are referred to frequently as a salad pear due to their  crispness. Asian pear trees are  often considered self fertile but really produce a better crop when two or more varieties are planted together and where they can get 6-8 hours of sun.  They usually ripen at the end of the summer and in the early fall, depending on the type, from sometime in late August to October.  When the summers are cooler that tends to  delay the ripening process but a warmer one will hasten it.  Asian pears are a great source of vitamins B and C. One large Asian pear also contains about 30% of your daily fiber intake and helps to promote healthy cholesterol.

It is good when planting them to plant them about 15 feet apart.    From my experience when I planted mine about 5 or 7 feet apart as I read when planting them, several years ago, and they seem to take turns having pears now. Different years different trees will  produce fruit but never all of them.  I wonder if I’d planted them further apart if they all would have had fruit annually.    Usually within about 4 or 5 years after planting them the Asian pear trees will start to give fruit..They really like rich moist soil, so it is a good idea to water the trees during some of the hot dry spells in the summer.  It is good to keep pruning the tree too, with one leading stem at the top. sort of shaped like a christmas tree. and to keep the trees from getting too tall.  Usually every year or two I prune the trees.

In the spring when they first start to have lots of flowers it can help to thin 35-50%of the flowers so that the fruits that form will be bigger. If several are forming in one group if you prefer larger pears you may want to diminish the. number of pears to just one per group.  If you don’t diminish the number of pears in each group you may need to get some support for the branches    When I first started  getting my first cone tree had so many pears that  it couldn’t stand up and I tried to give it some support but on a summer storm the tree collapsed and the trunk broke.  I had to wait a few more years before I got any pears from that one again.

Asian Pear Trees

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